Monday, October 31, 2005

I've almost finished Naked Conversations, which isn't as racy as it sounds. I've read most of it on the book's blog, as it has been written, so there weren't any major surprises. As an aside though, it did seem somehow longer on the page. Maybe I skip more words when I'm reading on the screen.

Their premise is that almost every company should blog. I'm skeptical (or sceptical, I'm never sure) that every company is interesting enough, or even almost every. However their well researched arguments are beginning to win me over. There's a lot of interview material, with a wide range of people - even those that disagree with them on some points.

There's a major blunder on human geography in one chapter, where they describe the British Isles as consisting of Ireland and England. I think a bit of research is needed on how the Republic of Ireland, Northern Ireland, England, Scotland and Wales fit together.

Shel told me that (name dropper!) they were making some of the anedcotes more current, as the fact that the book was written over a number of months shows. This being a galley proof, it says things like "as at August 2005" which was only two months ago - this is strange to read because books are normally months or years out of date.

Tuesday, October 25, 2005

I remember when I got my first book from Amazon several years ago. With it came an Amazon bookmark and for the first time I had something tangible from the internet. The book could have been from anywhere, and the clever packaging got thrown away, but the bookmark meant that I had some evidence of the virtual world I'd been exploring.

It's happened again now. I've got a galley proof copy of a book that I've followed as it's been drafted in public. I've been reading the blog of one of the authors, Robert Scoble, for a while now, and here is something tangible of his existence.

Monday, October 10, 2005

It's a big deal when a magazine or a newspaper has a redesign. Similarly with websites. It's something to do with the fact that it's easy to churn out issue after issue/page after page using the same layouts, fonts etc.

I would have thought that in the dynamic web world you could spend more time with your templates, spending more effort making them work harder for you, so each new page looks like an evolution, or a minor redesign, whereas you haven't put any effort into that page, you just put it in at the beginning. Does that make any sense?

Wednesday, October 05, 2005